Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too

Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too
Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too
Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too
Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too
Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too
Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too

Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too
In oval 18th century carved frame. Portrait of a gentleman c1760. Around 250/260 years old, from the reign of George III. The lady of what were bought as a pair, is concurrently listed. Both are in similar typical 18th century oval frames of the period with lovely original leaf gilding. Sometimes such are fully carved, sometimes they're gesso, these frames are actually both (body and inner decoration carved, outer decoration gesso). This portrait of the 18th century gentlman and that of the concurrently listed pretty 18th century lady were bought as a traditional classic lady and gentleman pair c1760. They're the same age with the same size of figure and they've clearly been together all their lives. They've been treated the same and are obviously related, but it's still debatable whether they are technically actually really a pair. Somewhere along the line they've been framed slightly differently, where those lovely, similar 18th century and contemporaneous frames are slightly differently proportioned. Because of that difference, I'm listing them separately, but I would obviously prefer them to stay together. The frame for this gentleman measures: 11 x 10 inches (28 x 25.4 cm). Visible image size, inside slip: 8 5/8 x 7 5/8 inches (22 x 19.3 cm). And photos are included with this to show both portraits together. For convenient reference, the equivalent measurements for the lady are. The frame for the lady: 12 x 9 3/4 inches (30.5 x 24.7 cm). Visible image size, inside slip: 8 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches (21.5 x 16.5 cm). Both portraits have a Frost & Reed label on the backing paper verso, quoting the job/inventory number 8111 and date 19.11.51. There's also the name "Baker", which was presumably the name of the owner at the time. Those labels were obviously put on with that backing paper, and they're referencing Frost and Reed restoration at that time. I bought the two portraits as a pair in exactly the same condition they're now in, barring having taken one out to see what there was to see. And as sitting on a beam, slightly offset (similar as hung), the slight difference hasn't been at all noticeable.

Until I came to start to write this, in truth, I'd actually forgotten they were slightly different. The paintings are visibly obviously on canvas at the front, but when taken out, that canvas was found to be laid on a millboard type board at the back, which the paper was covering. It might be presumed that they were so laid by Frost and Reed in 1951, but while the back of the board is an unusually pale colour for the 1820's (the core is as very dark and hard as typical early C19 millboard), I'm still inclined to think the boards are (a lot) earlier than that, but that's not a certainty. What also isn't quite clear is whether the paintings have always been in those frames, prior to having been laid (whenever), or whether they've been put together later. The frames are stylistically perfect, of the right age, and are of the same design.

One is just rather more oval than the other. If they're both the original frames, then the two weren't intended to be an actual "pair" (same family probably, same artist probably, but not necessarily husband and wife). But if either one or both frames were sourced replacement frames (be that either in the 1820's or the 1950's or inbetween), then it might have been that the restorer just couldn't find an exact match (or an exact pair) and what was used just reflected the best frame option(s) available at the time. For record, also, the gilded card slip re the lady portrait (which I managed to break accidentally - now supported and put back) is both of an age and type and fragility that rules out having been made in the 1950's. It's 150 years old at least, so that's consistent with the paintings having been laid earlier too.

Condition wise, they have been laid etc, and Frost and Reed (per label verso) did some work on them in 1951, and that's how they stand now. T hey're good to hang as they are (nice little old brass loops at the top), with nothing demanding urgent attention. There's a small lump under the canvas of the gentleman's portrait, to the side of the head, but there's nothing to be sensibly done about that. It could be shaved off and painted in, but better not. The antique frames are fragile, as such always are, particularly re the outer gesso decoration. They have been mended a bit in the past and there are some more losses again now, particularly around the sides.

A front piece came off one earlier, as I was checking for looseness, but that was obviously fastened firmly straight back. There's nothing significant obviously loose or likely to fall now but it's still not very unlikely that something might come off in transit, so the frames (although significantly valuable in their own right) are technically included as complementary. Please just check them on receipt and make sure anything loose to the front is detected and anything significant that falls is stuck back quickly before being separated and lost permanently. Carefully and with NO WATER to be used anywhere near any of that gilding. Any queries, please just ask.

The item "Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too" is in sale since Sunday, September 2, 2018. This item is in the category "Art\Paintings". The seller is "gallery-verite" and is located in Winchester. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Antique Georgian gentleman 18th century oval oil portrait c1760 Lovely frame too


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